basketball standards

Basketball Standards, Hoops and Goals – What’s the Difference?

I work for an online sports paraphernalia company that offers a wide variety of basketball apparel and equipment. So much so that potential customers are often confused about what to buy and what will ultimately fit their needs. The majority of the confusion pertains to basketball standards, hoops and goals and what each entails. Well, here’s the skinny on each.

Basketball Standard: Basketball standards are the most expensive of the bunch. They can be either portable or stationary. When you think basketball standard you should think of the type of basketball system that is used in the NBA or out on the playground. Simply put, a basketball standard is the entire package – rim, backboard, net and pole.

Basketball Hoop: When little Johnny writes to Santa Claus telling him he wants a basketball hoop for Christmas, he means that he wants the entire package. However, a basketball hoop is not quite the entire package. A basketball hoop is the combination of a rim, net and backboard, but no pole. Think of your high school gym. Yes, you probably had a basketball standard in there somewhere which the basketball team most likely used for real games. But you also had basketball hoops on the surrounding walls. That is what a basketball hoop is – a rim, net and backboard that can be fastened to an already existing structure.

Basketball Goal: The name of this particular piece of equipment get its name from its intended purpose. The word goal is something you strive towards. In sports, the goal is usually the place where you score points. Well, the same is true in basketball. The goal is just another name for the rim.

When purchasing sporting equipment, it is good to know the difference between the various technical terms associated with each individual sport. If you don’t, you may unintentionally buy something which you did not want.

Source by Nishan Wilde

football rules

History of Changes in Soccer Football Rules – A Thorough Look

History of Changes in Soccer Football Rules – Introduction

It should be noted that the primary motive for all the official changes in football rules is to improve the spirit of the game and make the game better in every possible way. Essentially, we will look at the major changes in the 19th century and the 20th century. As one can understand after going through this article, the game has undergone considerable changes in its rules over a period of time and this will be an ongoing process. As times change and new exploits are pointed out, the official game rules will continue to change either to fix or to improve the game.

Early Rules Changes

We should not forget that soccer existed hundreds of years before and people used to play football with varying rules during the initial days of football.

There were no proper common rules before 1863 to govern the game and changes in football rules were frequent during those initial periods. One of such two early rules that gained popularity are the Cambridge rules, first drawn up at Cambridge University in 1848 and the Sheffield Football Club rules, formed by former public school pupils in 1857.

During the early 1860s, there were increasing attempts in England to unify and reconcile the various football games that were played in the public schools as well in the industrial north under the Sheffield Rules.

19th Century Changes

The first uniform football rules and regulations were formed in the year 1863.The Cambridge Rules are taken as a base and are rewritten to arrive at the first official laws of the game. In the year 1866, the offside law is changed to allow players to be onside provided there are three players between the ball and the goal.

The year 1891 is a very important year for soccer rules in particular and the game in general. A game changing rule called “the penalty-kick” was first introduced into the game. A penalty kick is awarded against a team which commits offence within the 18 yard box, also called the penalty box. This changed the game drastically and offered an immense advantage to the team that is awarded a penalty kick.

20th Century Changes

The year 1925 witnessed another major change in soccer “offside” rule. The offside law which is conceived in the year 1866 initially allowed players to be onside provided there are three players between the ball and the goal. The amendment in 1925 changed the number from three to two players.

Substitutes are permitted for the first time in the year 1958. But this confined only for an injured goalkeeper and one other injured player.

Card system is introduced in the year 1970. The system of red and yellow cards is introduced for the 1970 FIFA World Cup finals as a means of warning or penalising a player. Referees indicate that a player has committed an offense and red card represents more serious offense than the yellow card.

In 1990 the offside law is once again changed and this time in favour of the attacker. As per this change in law, the attacker is now said to be onside if he/she is in level with the penultimate defender.

Other changes include the Goalkeepers forbidden from handing back-passes in 1992. The technical area is introduced into the Laws of the Game in 1994, with the Fourth Official following the next year. Initially who were referred to as “Linesmen” are renamed as “Assistant Referees”, in the year 1996. In the year 1997 the Laws are revised once again for the betterment of the game.


How to Play Basketball – Rules of the Game

Most basketball associations (most notably, the NBA) have their own specific set of rules of play, though all are similar at their core. Here is, more or less, the international standard guidebook for how to play basketball. Two 10′ hoops will be set up at opposite ends of a court. NBA and collegiate standard size is 94′ long (and 50′ wide), though courts (and hoop height) can be shorter, especially for younger players.

Games are played by 2 teams of 5 players each for a total of 1 hour. Collegiate and high school games are divided into 4 10-minute quarters (pros play for 12, and younger players either 6 or 8 minutes). The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Game play begins at the mid-court line during a tip off. The ball is then taken by the offense towards a basket through dribbling and passing, while the defense tries to gain possession of the ball (thus becoming the offense). When the team scores they are given 2 points, with the exception of baskets scored from outside the 3-point line, for which they get 3. The other team is then given possession. Play continues like this until halftime, when the teams switch sides.

If at any point in the game a team commits a foul, the other team is awarded free throws. Free throws are worth 1 point each. These shots are taken unguarded from the free-throw line outside of game time. Blocking, charging, hacking and holding are all offenses that carry a free-throw penalty.

rules of golf

The Evolution Of The Rules Of Golf

The Evolution Of The Rules Of Golf

The first known rulebook was laid out by the ‘Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers’ in 1744. And on the back cover of that rule book, as a guiding principle of ‘Fairness’ is the overriding principle: Play the ball as it lies, play the course as you find it, and if you cannot do either, do what is fair.

Rules are standardized and governed by the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews in Scotland and the United States Golf Association, who collaborate to ensure consistency and fairness.

The rules of golf have evolved over the years. In the olden days there was no such thing as ‘out of bounds’. ‘Play it where it lies’ was the common saying that was developed and it’s still in use today. Of course, this is not really practical as it is perfectly possible to hit a ball out of the course boundaries. Thus the ‘Out of bounds’ rule has long been in force, meaning a 1 stroke penalty and the 3rd shot being played from either where the ball went out of bounds, or from the site of the original stroke.

Nowadays a golfer is allowed 14 clubs in his bag and the make up of these clubs is completely up to the individual golfer (within the rules of golf of course). For example a ruling in 1909 makes a Croquet Mallet unacceptable as a golf club. Who would have thought?

Original golfers used balls made of wood and then the feathery ball became standard from the 1600s until the Gutta-percha balls were introduced in 1848. However, there were no rules actually governing the balls. The Gutta-percha balls used to break so the first rules regarding replacement balls was in 1850. Replacement balls were allowed where the largest piece of a broken ball ended up. It was not until 1920 that the rules actually specified that a ball would weigh 1.62 ounces and have a diameter of 1.62 inches. This was eventually changed in 1973 to a 1.68 inch diameter ball, favored by the Americans.

Hazards are another area where the rules have taken a long time to catch up. The first definition of a hazard was in 1891 and anything in the way of a ‘fair lie’ was considered a hazard. These rules have been updated and changed to include things like ground under repair, water hazard, etc.

Rule #1 was an interesting rule. This rule was never codified until 1891. This rule states that the objective of the game is to get a ball from the tee into a hole. This rule was then dropped again for some unstated reason in 1933 and only reincorporated in 1952. Play from a Tee or not to play from a Tee? I know a few golfers myself who’d rather not use the Tee. Although, with advancements in club size and technologies I believe most people are happy to ‘Tee Off’.

Golf rules and regulations have changed over the years quite a bit. Fashions and styles of clubs have also changed. There has been some movement back to classic looking clubs and drivers that has caused quite the shake-up in the golf industry. A very interesting concept of combining old styles with new technology. Zenieus Golf has revived vintage clubs and brought them up to speed. These clubs are excellent golf gifts for any avid player of the game.

Baseball Interference

Baseball Rules – Can You Name 5 Common Kinds of Baseball Interference?

Can You Name the 5 Most Common Kinds of Baseball Interference?

If you coach, play or watch baseball, you should be familiar with the term “baseball interference”. Baseball interference is described as any infraction or action by a person that illegally alters the course of baseball play. The five types of interference are covered by the rules and different rules are applied in each type of interference. The 5 kinds of interference can be committed either by an offensive player, a player off the bench, a catcher, an umpire, and a spectator. This article describes and explains the 5 most common kinds of interference called by umpires.

The 5 most frequently kinds of baseball interference that occur are:

Offensive Physical Interference

Offensive interference is when an offensive player causes a defensive player to misplay a hit ball. The offensive player physically interferes with the defensive player that is in the act of attempting to field a ball. This contact allows a base runner to advance or makes it more difficult for the player to get an out. This is the most commonly called kind of interference. When offensive interference is committed, the ball immediately becomes dead. If a batter or a base runner the commits the interference that player is called out. All runners must return to the bases they occupied at the time of the interference.

If offensive interference is committed by a runner with the intent of preventing a double play, both, the batter and the runner committing the interference will be called out.

Offensive Verbal Interference

Did you know that interference can be called on a player in the dugout? A player can commit what is called “Verbal Interference” from the dugout. Verbal interference may also be called on an offensive player. Calling out “foul” on a fair ball or “mine” on a fly ball, to confuse or hinder a defensive play is offensive verbal interference.

Umpire interference

Umpire interference is when a umpire interferes with a catcher attempting to make a throw. If the umpire`s action does not prevent the catcher from making the play, the play stands. If the action by the umpire causes a runner to be safe, the ball is dead and all runners must return to their time of throw bases. Umpire interference also occurs an umpire is struck by a fair batted ball before it touches or passes near an infielder other than the pitcher. The ball is dead, the batter is awarded first base, and all other runners advance only if forced.

Catcher interference

When a catcher physically hinders the swing of a batter, Catcher interference is called. Catcher interference is most commonly called when the bat touches the catching mitt during a swing. This most frequently occurs when a runner is attempting to steal and the catcher is too anxious to catch the ball. When catcher interference occurs, play continues, and after continuous playing action ceases, the umpire will call time. The batter is awarded first base, any runner attempting to steal is awarded that base, and all other runners advance only if forced. The catcher is charged with an error.

Spectator interference

Spectator interference most frequently occurs when a spectator in the first row of seats reaches onto the field to attempt to grab a fair or foul fly ball. Spectator interference occurs when If the umpire judges that the fielder could have caught the ball over the field. The ball becomes dead, and the umpire will award any bases or charge any outs that, in his judgment, would have occurred without the interference.

I hope that you found this article to be informative. I really appreciate you taking the time to read it. Have a great day, Nick.

Get to Know – Soccer Rules

Similar to any other game, there are some key rules in soccer that players need to follow at all times while playing the game. The rules are as below.

1. In this game, altogether there are two teams to play on field with each team consisting of 11 players. Of them, 10 players are usually the outfield players. The remaining eleventh player is the goalkeeper, who alone has the permission for touching the soccer ball using any body part.

2. This game normally lasts for 90 minutes divided into two equal halves with each half allotted with a 45 minutes period. The referee reserves the right to add on some more time finally at the game end to compensate for any time lost due to stoppages.

3. An important rule in soccer is that except for the goalkeeper, none of the players on field has the permission for touching the ball using hands. They may use any other body part, but strictly not their forearm and hands. Thus, players of both the teams use their foot to run ahead towards their opponent’s goal with the ball.

4. While playing soccer, every player has to abide by the dress code on field, which indeed matters much in this game. There is one specific players’ kit or uniform to wear. The uniform of outfield players of one team has to be of a different color, which easily identifies them from those outfield players of another team. The goalkeeper has to put on the uniform of a color, which distinguishes him from all other 10 players in a team. In organized soccer matches, players need to put on shorts, studded boots and shin pads that are covered by extended socks. The back of shirts displays a unique number for recognizing every player.