basketball standards

Basketball Standards, Hoops and Goals – What’s the Difference?

I work for an online sports paraphernalia company that offers a wide variety of basketball apparel and equipment. So much so that potential customers are often confused about what to buy and what will ultimately fit their needs. The majority of the confusion pertains to basketball standards, hoops and goals and what each entails. Well, here’s the skinny on each.

Basketball Standard: Basketball standards are the most expensive of the bunch. They can be either portable or stationary. When you think basketball standard you should think of the type of basketball system that is used in the NBA or out on the playground. Simply put, a basketball standard is the entire package – rim, backboard, net and pole.

Basketball Hoop: When little Johnny writes to Santa Claus telling him he wants a basketball hoop for Christmas, he means that he wants the entire package. However, a basketball hoop is not quite the entire package. A basketball hoop is the combination of a rim, net and backboard, but no pole. Think of your high school gym. Yes, you probably had a basketball standard in there somewhere which the basketball team most likely used for real games. But you also had basketball hoops on the surrounding walls. That is what a basketball hoop is – a rim, net and backboard that can be fastened to an already existing structure.

Basketball Goal: The name of this particular piece of equipment get its name from its intended purpose. The word goal is something you strive towards. In sports, the goal is usually the place where you score points. Well, the same is true in basketball. The goal is just another name for the rim.

When purchasing sporting equipment, it is good to know the difference between the various technical terms associated with each individual sport. If you don’t, you may unintentionally buy something which you did not want.

Source by Nishan Wilde

football rules

History of Changes in Soccer Football Rules – A Thorough Look

History of Changes in Soccer Football Rules – Introduction

It should be noted that the primary motive for all the official changes in football rules is to improve the spirit of the game and make the game better in every possible way. Essentially, we will look at the major changes in the 19th century and the 20th century. As one can understand after going through this article, the game has undergone considerable changes in its rules over a period of time and this will be an ongoing process. As times change and new exploits are pointed out, the official game rules will continue to change either to fix or to improve the game.

Early Rules Changes

We should not forget that soccer existed hundreds of years before and people used to play football with varying rules during the initial days of football.

There were no proper common rules before 1863 to govern the game and changes in football rules were frequent during those initial periods. One of such two early rules that gained popularity are the Cambridge rules, first drawn up at Cambridge University in 1848 and the Sheffield Football Club rules, formed by former public school pupils in 1857.

During the early 1860s, there were increasing attempts in England to unify and reconcile the various football games that were played in the public schools as well in the industrial north under the Sheffield Rules.

19th Century Changes

The first uniform football rules and regulations were formed in the year 1863.The Cambridge Rules are taken as a base and are rewritten to arrive at the first official laws of the game. In the year 1866, the offside law is changed to allow players to be onside provided there are three players between the ball and the goal.

The year 1891 is a very important year for soccer rules in particular and the game in general. A game changing rule called “the penalty-kick” was first introduced into the game. A penalty kick is awarded against a team which commits offence within the 18 yard box, also called the penalty box. This changed the game drastically and offered an immense advantage to the team that is awarded a penalty kick.

20th Century Changes

The year 1925 witnessed another major change in soccer “offside” rule. The offside law which is conceived in the year 1866 initially allowed players to be onside provided there are three players between the ball and the goal. The amendment in 1925 changed the number from three to two players.

Substitutes are permitted for the first time in the year 1958. But this confined only for an injured goalkeeper and one other injured player.

Card system is introduced in the year 1970. The system of red and yellow cards is introduced for the 1970 FIFA World Cup finals as a means of warning or penalising a player. Referees indicate that a player has committed an offense and red card represents more serious offense than the yellow card.

In 1990 the offside law is once again changed and this time in favour of the attacker. As per this change in law, the attacker is now said to be onside if he/she is in level with the penultimate defender.

Other changes include the Goalkeepers forbidden from handing back-passes in 1992. The technical area is introduced into the Laws of the Game in 1994, with the Fourth Official following the next year. Initially who were referred to as “Linesmen” are renamed as “Assistant Referees”, in the year 1996. In the year 1997 the Laws are revised once again for the betterment of the game.

Basketball

How to Play Basketball – Rules of the Game

Most basketball associations (most notably, the NBA) have their own specific set of rules of play, though all are similar at their core. Here is, more or less, the international standard guidebook for how to play basketball. Two 10′ hoops will be set up at opposite ends of a court. NBA and collegiate standard size is 94′ long (and 50′ wide), though courts (and hoop height) can be shorter, especially for younger players.

Games are played by 2 teams of 5 players each for a total of 1 hour. Collegiate and high school games are divided into 4 10-minute quarters (pros play for 12, and younger players either 6 or 8 minutes). The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Game play begins at the mid-court line during a tip off. The ball is then taken by the offense towards a basket through dribbling and passing, while the defense tries to gain possession of the ball (thus becoming the offense). When the team scores they are given 2 points, with the exception of baskets scored from outside the 3-point line, for which they get 3. The other team is then given possession. Play continues like this until halftime, when the teams switch sides.

If at any point in the game a team commits a foul, the other team is awarded free throws. Free throws are worth 1 point each. These shots are taken unguarded from the free-throw line outside of game time. Blocking, charging, hacking and holding are all offenses that carry a free-throw penalty.

rules of golf

The Evolution Of The Rules Of Golf

The Evolution Of The Rules Of Golf

The first known rulebook was laid out by the ‘Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers’ in 1744. And on the back cover of that rule book, as a guiding principle of ‘Fairness’ is the overriding principle: Play the ball as it lies, play the course as you find it, and if you cannot do either, do what is fair.

Rules are standardized and governed by the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews in Scotland and the United States Golf Association, who collaborate to ensure consistency and fairness.

The rules of golf have evolved over the years. In the olden days there was no such thing as ‘out of bounds’. ‘Play it where it lies’ was the common saying that was developed and it’s still in use today. Of course, this is not really practical as it is perfectly possible to hit a ball out of the course boundaries. Thus the ‘Out of bounds’ rule has long been in force, meaning a 1 stroke penalty and the 3rd shot being played from either where the ball went out of bounds, or from the site of the original stroke.

Nowadays a golfer is allowed 14 clubs in his bag and the make up of these clubs is completely up to the individual golfer (within the rules of golf of course). For example a ruling in 1909 makes a Croquet Mallet unacceptable as a golf club. Who would have thought?

Original golfers used balls made of wood and then the feathery ball became standard from the 1600s until the Gutta-percha balls were introduced in 1848. However, there were no rules actually governing the balls. The Gutta-percha balls used to break so the first rules regarding replacement balls was in 1850. Replacement balls were allowed where the largest piece of a broken ball ended up. It was not until 1920 that the rules actually specified that a ball would weigh 1.62 ounces and have a diameter of 1.62 inches. This was eventually changed in 1973 to a 1.68 inch diameter ball, favored by the Americans.

Hazards are another area where the rules have taken a long time to catch up. The first definition of a hazard was in 1891 and anything in the way of a ‘fair lie’ was considered a hazard. These rules have been updated and changed to include things like ground under repair, water hazard, etc.

Rule #1 was an interesting rule. This rule was never codified until 1891. This rule states that the objective of the game is to get a ball from the tee into a hole. This rule was then dropped again for some unstated reason in 1933 and only reincorporated in 1952. Play from a Tee or not to play from a Tee? I know a few golfers myself who’d rather not use the Tee. Although, with advancements in club size and technologies I believe most people are happy to ‘Tee Off’.

Golf rules and regulations have changed over the years quite a bit. Fashions and styles of clubs have also changed. There has been some movement back to classic looking clubs and drivers that has caused quite the shake-up in the golf industry. A very interesting concept of combining old styles with new technology. Zenieus Golf has revived vintage clubs and brought them up to speed. These clubs are excellent golf gifts for any avid player of the game.

Baseball Interference

Baseball Rules – Can You Name 5 Common Kinds of Baseball Interference?

Can You Name the 5 Most Common Kinds of Baseball Interference?

If you coach, play or watch baseball, you should be familiar with the term “baseball interference”. Baseball interference is described as any infraction or action by a person that illegally alters the course of baseball play. The five types of interference are covered by the rules and different rules are applied in each type of interference. The 5 kinds of interference can be committed either by an offensive player, a player off the bench, a catcher, an umpire, and a spectator. This article describes and explains the 5 most common kinds of interference called by umpires.

The 5 most frequently kinds of baseball interference that occur are:

Offensive Physical Interference

Offensive interference is when an offensive player causes a defensive player to misplay a hit ball. The offensive player physically interferes with the defensive player that is in the act of attempting to field a ball. This contact allows a base runner to advance or makes it more difficult for the player to get an out. This is the most commonly called kind of interference. When offensive interference is committed, the ball immediately becomes dead. If a batter or a base runner the commits the interference that player is called out. All runners must return to the bases they occupied at the time of the interference.

If offensive interference is committed by a runner with the intent of preventing a double play, both, the batter and the runner committing the interference will be called out.

Offensive Verbal Interference

Did you know that interference can be called on a player in the dugout? A player can commit what is called “Verbal Interference” from the dugout. Verbal interference may also be called on an offensive player. Calling out “foul” on a fair ball or “mine” on a fly ball, to confuse or hinder a defensive play is offensive verbal interference.

Umpire interference

Umpire interference is when a umpire interferes with a catcher attempting to make a throw. If the umpire`s action does not prevent the catcher from making the play, the play stands. If the action by the umpire causes a runner to be safe, the ball is dead and all runners must return to their time of throw bases. Umpire interference also occurs an umpire is struck by a fair batted ball before it touches or passes near an infielder other than the pitcher. The ball is dead, the batter is awarded first base, and all other runners advance only if forced.

Catcher interference

When a catcher physically hinders the swing of a batter, Catcher interference is called. Catcher interference is most commonly called when the bat touches the catching mitt during a swing. This most frequently occurs when a runner is attempting to steal and the catcher is too anxious to catch the ball. When catcher interference occurs, play continues, and after continuous playing action ceases, the umpire will call time. The batter is awarded first base, any runner attempting to steal is awarded that base, and all other runners advance only if forced. The catcher is charged with an error.

Spectator interference

Spectator interference most frequently occurs when a spectator in the first row of seats reaches onto the field to attempt to grab a fair or foul fly ball. Spectator interference occurs when If the umpire judges that the fielder could have caught the ball over the field. The ball becomes dead, and the umpire will award any bases or charge any outs that, in his judgment, would have occurred without the interference.

I hope that you found this article to be informative. I really appreciate you taking the time to read it. Have a great day, Nick.

Get to Know – Soccer Rules

Similar to any other game, there are some key rules in soccer that players need to follow at all times while playing the game. The rules are as below.

1. In this game, altogether there are two teams to play on field with each team consisting of 11 players. Of them, 10 players are usually the outfield players. The remaining eleventh player is the goalkeeper, who alone has the permission for touching the soccer ball using any body part.

2. This game normally lasts for 90 minutes divided into two equal halves with each half allotted with a 45 minutes period. The referee reserves the right to add on some more time finally at the game end to compensate for any time lost due to stoppages.

3. An important rule in soccer is that except for the goalkeeper, none of the players on field has the permission for touching the ball using hands. They may use any other body part, but strictly not their forearm and hands. Thus, players of both the teams use their foot to run ahead towards their opponent’s goal with the ball.

4. While playing soccer, every player has to abide by the dress code on field, which indeed matters much in this game. There is one specific players’ kit or uniform to wear. The uniform of outfield players of one team has to be of a different color, which easily identifies them from those outfield players of another team. The goalkeeper has to put on the uniform of a color, which distinguishes him from all other 10 players in a team. In organized soccer matches, players need to put on shorts, studded boots and shin pads that are covered by extended socks. The back of shirts displays a unique number for recognizing every player.

soccer

The Origin of Soccer

Although it may be impossible to accurately state when and where the game of soccer originated, history has shown us glimpses of a game similar to our present day version being played for over 3000 years.

Around the 2nd or 3rd Century BC, it was documented that the Chinese military during the Han Dynasty played a game involving kicking a ball into a small net.

A game similar to soccer was played by the ancient Greeks and Romans but their game could include up to 27 players on a side compared to the modern day game of 11 players to a side.

Soccer became one of the most popular sports of the masses due to its popularity as a war game. A game of “football” which the British called it, was played in the east of England during the 8th Century where the head of a defeated Danish Prince was used as the ball.

During medieval times, villages and towns were pitted against each other in game battles that could take all day. There were no structured rules to abide by and kicking, biting, gouging and punching turned the game into a virtual battle of survival. These matches became so violent that the English authorities made many attempts to have soccer banned.

King Edward III from England passed laws in 1331 to abolish the game and Queen Elizabeth I had a law passed that provided a one week jail sentence for anyone caught playing soccer.

Despite these efforts, the game of soccer became so popular in England over the next few centuries that it evolved as the most popular sport of its time.

At this point, the only shortcoming of the sport was its lack of rules or standards. In 1815, Eton College, a famous English school, established a set of rules to be implemented by other schools, colleges and universities.

A standardized version of these rules were later adopted in 1848 by most of England’s colleges and universities that were known as the Cambridge Rules.

Unfortunately, at this point, there were still two different sets of rules being used. Some colleges favored the Rugby Rules which allowed carrying the ball with your hands, tripping and kicking to the shins. which were contrary to the Cambridge Rules.

In 1863, The Football Association was created by eleven English soccer clubs and schools to establish a single set of rules to be enforced when they played against each other.

The supporters of the Rugby School rules objected to the changes and the two groups split apart. The Football Association later changed the rules in 1869 where they forbade the use of hands, except by the goalie, which led us to the game of soccer as we know it today.

The English still called it a game of “football” because the ball was played primarily with the feet but in the late 18th Century, the word, “soccer”, was first used by a student of Oxford University by the name of Charles Wreford Brown. The students at Oxford were known for using slang where they added “er” to the end of words that they intentionally shortened. The game of Rugby was called “rugger”. Brown shortened the word “association” and added “er” and the term “soccer” was born.

Since the 19th Century the game has evolved to where it is today. It is the World’s Game that is played by more people than any other sport and is universally recognized as the most popular game in sports history.

The World Cup which is held every four years to crown a World Champion draws millions of spectators to the 32 games played and is watched by billions of fans from around the globe thanks to modern day satellite television technology.

The popularity of soccer continues to grow as organized youth soccer programs are getting a young fan base involved at an early age which will fuel its growth for years to come.

Source by Michael Russell

basketball drills

Basketball Drills That Work

Basketball drills are the most important factor when trying to improve your game. No matter what sport you play or if you are learning a new job skill you must learn the foundementals first. Once you have a solid understanding of how to perform the basic skills needed to play basketball you can add to them and become a better player. Even profesional basketball players still do drills every day.

Basketball drills range from as simple as practising a chest pass with another player to basketball drills that require multiple players to work on game time simulations, like practising a fast break by running 3 players against 2 defenders.

No matter what skill level you are at or what type of basketball drills you are doing , you must warm up first to avoid injury. Simple drills may not seem very demanding but if you have stiff muscles you run the risk of pulling something. All you need to do to warm up is some stretching of the legs and back for 10 minutes. After stretching some light running to get the heart going and you should be ready to practise your basketball drills.

There are whole books written on the subject of basketball drills, I’ll just cover the larger catagories. This will be a very simplistic overview and not meant to insult those of you that have played the game for a while.

1. Ball handling, this includes dribbling and passing.

2. Shooting, this includes lay ups, free throws, 3 point shots and jump shots from varying points on the court.

3. Rebounding, both offensive and defensive.

4. Offensive play

5. Defnsive play

All these are vary broad catagories and many books have been written on each subject by itself.

To continue to improve your basketball game you must always work on the basics but keep adding more difficult basketball drills as you progress. The things you find difficult today will seem easy after practising them for a while. before you can steal the ball, drive the length of the court and do a spinning 360 dunk, you have to become a accomplished defensive player and ball handler.

Just think, if you pay your dues, practise hard and get some good coaching and training advice you may just get a free ride to college. Look at some of the people in the NBA that came right out of high school to make a impact. They did that by working harder than everyone else and practising basketball drills over and over until it was second nature.

 

There are some outstanding training systems available, put out by great athletes and trainers. A good training system will even have videos to help you see the best way to do your basketball drills. Get a training program, get to work. Who knows we may see you on TV some day.

Source by Mike Disrud

football conditioning

5 Drills For Extreme Football Conditioning

5 Drills For Extreme Football Conditioning

In the dark ages of football conditioning usually amounted to nothing more than running a few miles and maybe jogging up stadium steps. It was the old standby. And, often the only reason it was done was because that’s what your coach did when he was young, and his coach before him. . . and on and on and on. . . it was the mediocre conditioning conundrum and it struck football like a plague.

If there’s one thing that all football strength and conditioning coaches should agree on it’s that running sucks for improving football conditioning.

Jogging is boring, results killing, and, if you are over 200lbs (and you all should be), it can be hell on your knees and ankles. We never run distance in a game, and usually not much more than 30yards and often only 3 – 10yards!

Yet, no matter what, some football players continue to rely on the dreaded and unproductive jogging as the mainstay of their football conditioning programs.

Why?

I’m pretty sure it’s because most coaches grew up when the aerobics craze hit. Jogging was the solution from everything from fat loss, heart health, sports conditioning to solving world peace.

But, just because you did something 25-years ago doesn’t mean you should still do it! It used to be common practice to not allow your players to drink water during summer practices. It took a few tragic accidents before this stupid practice was put to rest.

How many times must we run around the practice field screaming “4th Quarter” before someone gets that in order to win the big games. . . the close games against good teams, we have to be in extreme football condition, or, as we like to say. . . game shape.

But, if you don’t run how the hell do you get “in shape?”

If you play a sport, you should do conditioning that is similar to the demands of your sport, which is why Football players have absolutely no business running distance. Ever.

Sprinting, of course, is the usual answer. And, it should be. But, for most of the country, sprinting outside isn’t always an option. Here in NJ it seems to either rain, snow or dump buckets of ice on us at the most random times. I can only imagine what the hell goes on in places where it really snows.

Sprinting in the snow may seem cool and hardcore, but, slip on one spot of ice and your season is done.

There are alternatives for those time. . .

But, a word of warning. . . it is not for the weak hearted.

Combining three exercises, often called Triple Threats, is not new. Early strongmen would often perform triples; typically a Two-Hands Anyhow, a Press, then a Side Press. Olympic lifters often use them and guys like Alwyn Cosgrove have applied complexes to fat loss training with phenomenal results. But, we aren’t talking about just combining exercises in the gym. Using Triple Threats for extreme football conditioning is a great way to get into amazing football shape even when going outside is impossible.

1. Prowler, Farmers Walk, Sprint

This movement is brutal. There’s just no point where it lets up. Start off by setting up a Prowler (or sled) about 30-yards from a set of loaded Farmer’s Walk bars. Very heavy dumbbells can be used if you don’t have access to Farmer’s bars.

Get down low and start pushing that Prowler. This should be a sprint, so don’t overload the sled too much. As soon as you reach the bars, pick them up and do a Farmer’s Walk back to the starting point. Then, drop the bars and sprint back to the prowler.

The last sprint might feel a little funny, especially on the later sets, but tough it out. Yell out “Fourth Quarter!” or whatever cliché gets you to keep going when you just want to vomit.

Start with 3 sets of this combo, rest as needed. When you get good, try to cut the rest periods down to 45-seconds. Gradually. Trust me, go gradually. Five sets of this will be enough for most. You can use it as a stand-alone movement, as part of a conditioning day, or as a finisher after a weight room session.

You can do this in the gym if outside isn’t a possibility. The Prowler wouldn’t go over well with the school, but, you can get a tarp or even a heavy piece of rug, throw a few plates on top, attach a rope and pull. Instant indoor sled.

2. Dumbbell Cleans, Dumbbell Front Squats, Dumbbell Duckwalk

This is a favorite of mine. It’s super easy to set up, easy to do, and is excellent for conditioning and teaching your body to be coordinated when tired. By the way, this is important. I’ve heard for years that you shouldn’t put high skill exercises toward the end of your strength sessions because you’re too tired to perform the movement correctly. But, seriously, if you play football (or any sport really) you damn well better be able to perform high skill movements when tired. You better be as fresh in the 4th Quarter as you were in pre-game warm ups!

This trio is great for teaching the body to be on point even as you tire. Grab two dumbbells and knock off 5 rapid fire Cleans.

On the 5th, immediately do 5 explosive Front Squats. Then, on the 5th, keep the ‘bells on your shoulders and go right into a Duckwalk. You can go for about 10 yards. But, speed of movement is more important.

The keys here are:

Speed! You have to move fast

25-Seconds rest between sets

Focus. . . you must learn to perform when tired

Go for 3 – 5 sets to begin with. This works great as a finisher, done at the end of a strength training session.

3. Kettlebell Swing, Kettlebell Bear Crawl, Kettlebell Push ups

This trio can also be done with Dumbbells, but it’s no where near as fun. It’s best to do this combo outside, preferable in crappy weather (conditioning is as much about mental toughness as it is physical). Yea, yea. . . I just said don’t sprint outside. . . there’s not sprinting here, sucka.

Start off by doing 10 – 15 reps in the KB Swing. As soon as you finish, drop down and, with kettlebells in hand, start doing a Bear Crawl. Crawl about 30 yards. When you reach the finish line, keep your hands on the K-bells and do as many push-ups as possible.

Rest as needed at first, but eventually try to cut the rest down to under 45-seconds between sets.

Once you get used to this combo, try doing it with two different size K-bells. No one ever said the weights always have to be perfectly balanced. This will increase difficulty and keep your stabilizers working the entire time.

This complex can be used as a finisher on an upper body day or as part of a conditioning day. Start off with4 sets and work up to 6. Experiment with different Kettlebell weights, try using dumbbells, or wear a weighted vest throughout to increase the workload.

4. Sandbag Bearhug Carry, Shoulder and Squat, Sandbag Deadlift

Again, best to head outside for this one, but, if you can’t then the gym is perfectly fine. I’ve said it a million times; Sandbags are excellent for improving strength and football conditioning. . . and it’s the #1 tool for bridging the gap between the weight room and the field.

You will have to play around a bit with the weight of the bag. If it’s too heavy, you’ll never make it. But, if it’s too light, the exercise becomes too easy. Starting light and going heavier is the best way to go.

Start off with feet shoulder-width apart. Bend and grab the bag just as you would a barbell Deadlift. You will have to find the best form for you, but, a good way to start for beginners is to Deadlift the bag to the thighs, then do a high-pull/hip pop combo to get it to the chest. If you’ve ever watched World Strongest Man competitions, you’ve seen this move used when lifting the large, round stones. It’ll take some practice to find your sweet spot, but, once you do, you’ll have very little problem.

Once the bag is at chest level, wrap your arms around it and squeeze the hell out of the damn thing. If you relax your grip, the bag will fall, especially as you get tired. Once secured, start walking. When you get to the 50-yard marker drop the bag, repeat the lifting sequence but this time get it to your shoulder. Do 5 reps each side.

When you hit the 10th rep, drop the bag again and do as many Deadlifts as you can. This is quite a bit of work in a short time, so it is ideal when used as a finisher. Start with 3 sets and gradually increase to six.

5. DB Swing, DB Snatch, DB OH Lunge

Again, if you are afraid of accidentally becoming a card carrying member of a Kettlebell Kult, you can use Dumbbells for this complex. This is best done with one ‘Bell at a time.

Grab one Kettlebell or Dumbbell, take a shoulder width stance and knock off 20 Swings. Immediately do 20 Snatches then, keep your arm locked out overhead and do 10 Lunges with each leg.

This is ideal for those who are forced to workout inside or in a very small gym because it takes up so little space. You can do the swings and snatches without much fear of some dummy walking directly in the path of the dumbbell. . . though I once saw Roder drop the bar he was doing Straight Leg Deadlifts onto his foot, so I guess ya never know, eh?

This is also a great way to condition when you can’t get to the school’s weight room. . . like on Christmas break. All you need is one dumbbell and some balls.

Depending on your needs, choose 1 – 3 of the combos and work them hard 2 – 3 times a week. If you are early in your off-season, one day a week should hold you. As the season draws near, or if you are looking to lose fat for a specific occasion, start to increase the amount of conditioning you do. The old mainstay of doing 3 weight training workouts and 2 conditioning sessions is a good starting point.

5 Drills For Extreme Football Conditioning
Source by Steve Morris

Basketball Shoes

Basketball Shoes

Playing basketball requires vigorous moves like running, jumping, side-to-side movements, blocking, and shooting. This involves a lot of wear and tear on shoes. In order to reduce wear and tear, basketball players need specially developed shoes, like basketball shoes.

Basketball shoes help in preventing lower body injuries by allowing the players to move quickly and by helping to transfer body weight. At the competitive, level you have to choose proper shoes.

Different players require different types of basketball shoes. Some players, especially power players, need shoes with high tops with maximum ankle support and comfort. Some others, like all-around players, need mid-sole shoes. Speedsters need lightweight, low-top shoes with no restriction of the ankles. Many players use tennis shoes for playing basketball, but there are risks in wearing these shoes, like the increased chance of sliding, becoming injured, and slowing down by weak grip.

Basketball shoes are made up of leather, synthetic leather, or canvas. The most frequently used material is synthetic leather, which is more durable and lightweight than natural leather. Some use only natural leather but these shoes have a tendency to stretch. Many basketball shoes have combinations of synthetic leather and natural leather or textile.

Team shoes feature a highly durable sock liner. Today, there are different styles of basketball shoes on the market. When buying a basketball shoe, the most important things to be noted are durability, support, traction, comfort, and style. There are different shoes for men and women.

Basketball shoes are more advanced than running shoes. When playing on a hardwood floor, you need shoes that provide good traction, both for forefoot and heel. The basketball shoe size must be suitable for the toes, arch, and heel. Many of these shoes have pillow-like landing pads with elastic quality. Many have heel plates for increased support. Basketball shoes are available in different colors or as team colors, and the pricing changes accordingly. These shoes can be purchased directly or online. The price of leather shoes ranges from $35 to $190 for a pair, but canvas shoes are available from as low as $17.

Source by Eddie Tobey